Vacant postdoc position: Modeling the impact of early plants on the Earth’s atmosphere

October 1, 2018Uncategorized

A postdoc position is now open in modeling the impact of Early Plants on atmospheric O2 and CO2 levels. We are looking for dedicated researchers with a track record of scientific excellence and publications, who apply numerical models to understand the global Earth system. See the description here and apply via the link: https://jobportal.ku.dk/videnskabelige-stillinger/?show=148133

Tais gives keynote address, Nov 5 2018 @ GSA Indianapolis

August 23, 2018Uncategorized

Geological Society of America Annual Meeting 2018: Nov 7, 2018 – Wed 10:30 AM Tais W. Dahl EVIDENCE FOR THE GREAT MID-PALEOZOIC TRANSITION LINKED TO THE COLONIZATIONS OF LAND T117 session at GSA, Greenhouse to Icehouse Transition: Global Events of the Devonian, Carboniferous, and Early Permian,  in the Indiana Convention Center, Room 140.  Nov 4, … Read More

Goldschmidt conference in Boston Aug 12–17 · our talks and sessions

August 7, 2018Uncategorized

Eva and Tais are presenting at this year’s Goldschmidt conference: 07j: 210, Wednesday @ 09:45 – 10:00 Ocean Redox Conditions between the Snowballs – Geochemical Constraints from Arena Formation, East Greenland Eva L. Scheller with Alex J. Dickson AJ, Donald E. Canfield, Christoph Korte, Kasper K. Kristiansen & Tais W. Dahl.   10l: 206, Wednesday @ 16:00 … Read More

Tenure seminar: Tais W. Dahl

May 28, 2018Uncategorized

The final step in the evaluation of Tenure Track assistant professors involves a seminar at the institute. In this respect, Tais will give a presentation on June 18th, 13:30–16:00 in the Auditorium of the Geological Museum, Øster Voldgade 5-7, 1350 Copenhagen K. Tenure Seminar Part 1 (13.30–14.15) is aimed at the non-specialists, who are interested … Read More

Publication: Animals set the direction for Earth’s carbon cycle

February 28, 2018Uncategorized

In a new paper led by Richard Boyle, we show that the emergence of animal ecosystems – and more specifically the animal burrowing and sediment mixing – acted to dampen the magnitude and duration of instabilities in the Earth’s long term carbon cycle. The paper is published in Geobiology.  Read the Rich’s comment on the … Read More

Why did it take so long before animals appeared on Earth?

August 28, 2017Uncategorized

One of the big mysteries in the history of life is why it took so long time for complex organisms to evolve. The Earth is 4.5 billion years old and fossils of the first motile animals are ca. 555 million years old. It took 3,945,000,000 years or almost 4 million millennia before evolution in mostly microbial ecosystems evolved organisms with a capacity to … Read More

Lecture: Andy Knoll – Systems Paleobiology

May 30, 2017Uncategorized

The relationship between Earth and life through time How Systems Paleobiology uses physiology as the conceptual bridge between paleobiological and geochemical data sets and provides us with a template for understanding global climate change and evaluation of the habitability of other planets.  Professor Andrew H. Knoll, Fisher Professor of Natural History,Departments of Organismic and Evolutionary … Read More