Tracing global ocean oxygenation from calcitic brachiopods

August 4, 2020Publication, Research, Students and postdocs

The uranium isotope composition of seawater provide insights to how much sediment burial occurs globally in anoxia settings. Therefore, it is desirable to measure uranium isotopes to track the oxygenation state of the oceans through geological time. However, there is currently no geological archive that can reliably record the composition of ancient seawater. Calcitic brachiopods … Read More

New paper: The impact of land plant evolution on Earth’s climate and oxygenation state

May 14, 2020Publication, Research

The colonization of land by plantss, fungi and animals has had a profound impact on Earth’s climate and oxygenation state. In a comprehensive review paper, we have summarize the current state of knowledge and compiled available evidence in support that terrestrial life has caused: Atmospheric CO2 decline and climatic cooling (permanent transition) Atmospheric O2 rise … Read More

New GCA paper: Volcanic eruptions triggered repeated marine anoxia and reveal global-scale feedbacks during the Permian-Triassic mass extinction 250 million yeers ago

April 18, 2020Publication, Research, Students and postdocs, Uncategorized

The largest animal extinction event in recorded history occurred 251 Ma at the Permian-Triassic boundary coinciding with expansive marine anoxia. In a new study, led by postdoc Feifei Zhang, of a greatly expanded dolomite section from the Carnic Alps, Austria, marine anoxia is found to have expanded in two pulses separated by ~100,000 years. Global … Read More

Tracking the global dynamics of Earth’s oxygen and biological production in deep time

September 12, 2019Uncategorized

In an article published online in PNAS Tuesday Sep 10th, we have demonstrated how a combination of metal isotope analyses in marine sedimentary rocks can constrain the global scale feedbacks between atmospheric oxygen, seafloor oxygenation, and marine biological production. The relationship between O2 and animal life turns out to be more entangled than first thought. … Read More

New study solves 500 million year old animal breathing paradox

August 12, 2019Publication, Research

Animals breath oxygen, but fossils of some of the earliest animals are found in what appears to be anoxic parts of the oceans. New research, led by Tais W. Dahl in collaboration with researchers from GEUS and Royal Holloway University London, shows that fluctuations in O2 availability at the seafloor allowed benthic animals to invade … Read More

Tais speaks at Teacher’s conference “Big Bang to Science”

August 7, 2019Uncategorized

The Niels Bohr Institute invites teachers to a conference called “Big Bang til Naturfag” (Big Bang to Science) to learn more about the history of the universe, our planet and the evolution life.  On Aug 6, 2019 Tais W. Dahl is giving the talk entitled “Det tidligste liv” (The earliest life). Hereafter, Morten Allentoft from … Read More

Susanne and Tais visit Potsdam Institut für Klima

June 25, 2019Uncategorized

Invited by Dr. Philipp Porada, Susanne and Tais will be visiting to expand our model understanding on how early plants affected the composition of the atmosphere and oceans. Thursday at 14:00, Tais will give a lecture entitled: “Evidence for the Great Mid-Paleozoic Transition linked to the colonizations of land” at Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact … Read More